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Marklin 39392 DRG CLASS 39.0-2 PASSENGER STEAM LOCOMOTIVE

Prototype: German State Railroad Company (DRG) class 39.0-2 passenger train steam locomotive. With short Wagner smoke deflectors and a Prussian type 2´2´ T 31,5 tender. Built starting in 1922 as the class P 10 for the Prussian State Railways. The locomotive looks as it did around 1934.

Model: The locomotive has an mfx digital decoder and extensive sound functions. It also has controlled Softdrive Sine high-efficiency propulsion, and a compact design, maintenance-free can motor. 4 axles powered. Traction tires. The locomotive and tender are constructed mostly of metal. A 72270 smoke generator can be installed in the locomotive. The dual headlights change over with the direction of travel. The headlights and the smoke generator, which can be installed in the locomotive, will work in conventional operation and can be controlled digitally. The headlights are maintenance-free, warm white LEDs. There is a close coupling with a guide mechanism between the locomotive and the tender and it can be adjusted for curves. The back of the tender has a close coupler with a guide mechanism and an NEM coupler pocket. Minimum radius for operation is 360 mm / 14-3/16". Piston rod protection sleeves are included. Length over the buffers 26.3 cm / 10-3/8".

  Control
Unit
Sx Mobile
Station
DCC Mobile
Station 2
Central
Station
Headlight(s) · · · ·
Smoke generator contact · · · ·
Steam locomotive op. sounds · · · ·
Locomotive whistle · · · ·
Direct control · · · ·
Air Pump · · ·
Flickering Light in Fire Box · · ·
Whistle for switching maneuver · · ·
Letting off Steam · · ·
Sound of squealing brakes off · ·
Sound of coal being shoveled · ·
Grate Shaken · ·

Highlights:

  • New tooling for the Prussian type 2´2´ T 31,5 tender.
  • Especially finely detailed metal construction.
  • Compact design Softdrive Sine high-efficiency propulsion.
  • mfx decoder.
  • A wide variety of operating and sound functions that can be controlled digitally.

The Class 39 – A Powerful Locomotive in the Mittelgebirge Region. In 1919, development began at the firm of Borsig in Berlin for a passenger locomotive with a 2-8-2 "Mikado" wheel arrangement. Its job was chiefly to master heavy express train operation in the Mittelgebirge region. It could often be seen on the Main-Weser line, the Eifel line, the Schwarzwald or Black Forest line, the Gäu line, and in Saxony. Between 1922 and 1927, a total of 260 units of this locomotive with four driving axles left the builder's halls that the German State Railroad Company (DRG) designated as the class 39 and that were indispensable after World War II in both of the German states. These locomotives measured 22,890 mm / 75 feet 1-3/16 inches long and weighed 100.4 metric tons. They reached a maximum speed of 110 km/h / 68 mph with their three-cylinder running gear and had an indexed performance of 1,620 horsepower. However, the class 39 exceeded the required axle load of 17 metric tons considerably so that several of these powerful locomotives could not be used until the rail lines had been improved. The P 10 was considered to be the most powerful passenger locomotive among the provincial state railroads. On the German Federal Railroad most of these locomotives were equipped with Witte smoke deflectors and the type 2’2’ T 34 tender, which replaced the type pr2’2’ T 31,5 tender. The DB retired the class 39 in Stuttgart, where the last three units disappeared from service in 1967.

Express train passenger cars to go with this locomotive, the so-called "Hechtwagen" or "Pike Cars", are also being offered in 2011 in the Märklin new items assortment under item numbers 42232, 42252, 42253, and 42262.

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